Thursday, December 6, 2018

Congratulations to Illinios Tech's Ethics Bowl Team!



 

Congratulations to Illinois Tech’s Ethics Bowl Team members for their dedication and teamwork this semester, and an incredible performance at the Upper Midwest Regional Ethics Bowl at Illinois Tech this past Saturday. The team competed against 29 other teams from 20 schools across the Midwest, answering questions from a panel of judges about a collection of cases the students have been discussing since the beginning of the semester. 

The Illinois Tech team members who competed on Saturday are Sarah Davila (CAEE, 1st year) and Antonio Archilla (CHBE, 1st year). The team had incredible support from their fellow team members of QED: The Ethical Debaters, who helped in preparing for the event and running the event.
The Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl is an academic competition with rules and procedures designed to model the best approaches to reasoning about practical and professional ethics. Created and developed by IIT Philosophy Professor Robert Ladenson, the IEB has spread to include well over 150 teams from all over the United States and Canada.

QED: The Ethical Debaters is a club dedicated to discussing current ethical topics in the news and has a number of events planned for next semester including movie nights, guest speakers, and mini ethics-bowl competitions. If you are interested in learning more about QED, please visit our HawkLink page, or you can join our Google Group at iitethicsbowl@googlegroups.com.

Informed Experiences, Designing Consent

Informed Experiences, Designing Consent is a symposium interrogating the intersections of consent and the design of interactive media and technologies. The symposium is hosted at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago by the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions and the HASTAC Scholars fellowship program on April 6, 2019. It is organized by Michael Anthony DeAnda, Elisabeth Hildt, Kelly Laas, and Leilasadat Mirghaderi.
Informed Experiences, Designing Consent is a one-day event intended to bring together researchers, scholars, practitioners, and designers to consider the implications of theoretical, social, and material aspects of consent and design. Some examples of topics include: consent to participate in social media, user agreement, consent in gaming, informed consent to data collection and use, consent in digital humanities research. This workshop will consider ethical approaches to each of these respective fields of study and development. This event emphasizes theory and practice, structured on an iterative process of Learn, Make, Reflect. Here, participants will begin by listening to a panel on the topic of consent and design, then move to a group maker breakout session to design based off key concepts from the panel and return together to reflect on the process.
We invite researchers, scholars, practitioners, designers, makers, and ethicists to submit proposals for 10-15 minute presentations and to attend this event, particularly those interested in consent as it applies to:
  • Ethics and philosophy 
  • Informed Consent 
  • Design of experiences 
  • Game design and gaming culture 
  • Design and study of User Experience 
  • Website development 
  • Application design and mobile app design 
  • User Interface Design 
  • Data collection 
  • Digital Humanities 
  • Social Media Research 
  • User agreements 
  • Audience studies 
  • Design Research 
  • Research Methods and Practices 
  • Research Design 
  • Storytelling and digital storytelling 
  • Maker spaces and crafting
Proposal submissions should include a title, a 400-500 word abstract, and a bio of 100-150 words in length by January 23, 2019 to this form.
Any further questions may be directed to Michael DeAnda at mdeanda@hawk.iit.edu.

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Call for Papers for Special Issue Of Science and Engineering Ethics



Call for Papers
Special Issue of the journal Science and Engineering Ethics
Brain-Based and Artificial Intelligence: Socio-ethical Conversations in Computing and Neurotechnology
Editors: Elisabeth Hildt, Kelly Laas, Monika Sziron, Stephanie J. Bird
We are inviting papers to be included in a special issue of Science and Engineering Ethics  that seeks to explore the convergences and disparities in approaches to intelligence in neuroscience and computer science. The topic for this special issue comes from a May 2018 workshop organized by the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at the Illinois Institute of Technology, that reflected on how brain-based intelligence is similar to artificial intelligence (AI) and also how both can be combined in neurotechnology. Papers submitted for this special issue should explore the ethical and social implications that arise in AI and neurotechnology. Here the term “brain-based” intelligence encompasses both human and non-human animal intelligence. This special issue aims to advance an interdisciplinary discussion between scientists, practitioners, and scholars around these questions.
Both conference presenters and new authors are invited to submit an abstract for consideration.
Topics of contributions may include but are not limited to:
●    Finding a Common Language: Psychology, Neuroscience, and AI
●    Understanding Intelligence: The Physiological and the Mechanical
●    Ethics of Anthropomorphic Design and Processes in AI
●    Ethical and Social Implications of AI and Neurotechnology
●    Rights in AI and Neurotechnology: Policies, Regulations and Legislation
●    Similarities and Differences of Ethics in AI and Neuroscience
●    Science-fiction: Friend or Foe?
●    Merging of Brains and AI Technology
●    Brain-Computer Interfaces
●    Hybrid Intelligence
Submissions of up to 5,000 words are invited from the fields of neuroscience, computer science, engineering, psychology, philosophy, ethics, law, political science and social science.
Please submit an abstract (or revised workshop abstract) of up to 500 words. Abstracts are due September 15, 2018 and should be sent to Elisabeth Hildt at csep@iit.edu. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified of the editors' decision by October 1, 2018 and invited to submit a full paper. They will also receive further information regarding the formal requirements of the paper.
Full papers, of up to 5,000 words in length, double-spaced and in 12 point font are due December 15, 2018.
All manuscripts will go through the journal’s double blind peer review process.

General Information can also be found on the website of Science and Engineering Ethics (see Instruction for Authors): http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/applied+ethics/journal/11948

Facial Recognition, Values and the Human Brain

Dr. Elisabeth Hildt, Ethics Center Director, just published a blog post entitled "Facial Recognition, Values and the Human Brain on the Neuroethics Blog. 

Check it out! 

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Call for Abstracts: Brain-based and Artificial Intelligence: Socio-ethical Conversations in Computing and Neurotechnology



Call for Abstracts:

Workshop:
Brain-based and Artificial Intelligence: Socio-ethical Conversations in Computing and Neurotechnology

May 10-11, 2018, Chicago, IL
Organized by the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions, Illinois Institute of Technology

This workshop seeks to explore the convergences and disparities in approaches to intelligence in neuroscience
 and computer science. It will reflect on how brain-based intelligence is similar to artificial intelligence and also how
 both can be combined in neurotechnology. Based on this, the workshop will explore the ethical and social implications
 that arise in AI and neurotechnology. We are using the term ‘brain-based’ intelligence to encompass both human and
 non-human animal intelligence. The workshop aims to advance an interdisciplinary discussion between scientists, 
practitioners, and scholars around these questions.


Invited speakers:
  • Maria Gini, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota
  • Mark Coeckelbergh, Department of Philosophy, University of Vienna
  • Mikhail Lebedev, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University

Topics for presentations may include but are not limited to:
  • Finding a Common Language: Psychology, Neuroscience, and AI
  • Understanding Intelligence: The Physiological and the Mechanical
  • Ethics of Anthropomorphic Design and Processes in AI
  • Ethical and Social Implications of AI and Neurotechnology
  • Rights in AI and Neurotechnology: Policies, Regulations and Legislation
  • Similarities and Differences of Ethics in AI and Neuroscience
  • Science-fiction: Friend or Foe?
  • Merging of Brains and AI Technology
  • Brain-Computer Interfaces
  • Hybrid Intelligence
We invite presentations from the fields of neuroscience, computer science, engineering, psychology,
philosophy, ethics, law, political science and social science. Please submit an abstract of up to 500 words.
Abstracts for 20-30 minute presentations are due by March 9, 2018. Please send your abstract to
csep@iit.edu.
We also welcome your questions or proposals for additional workshop topics at csep@iit.edu.
The workshop will be held in Chicago at the Illinois Institute of Technology downtown campus.

For more information, please visit our web site.